Hip Conditioning Program – OrthoInfo – AAOS

 

Hip Conditioning Program

Purpose of Program

Getting Started

1. Standing Iliotibial Band Stretch

2. Seated Rotation Stretch

3. Knee to Chest

4. Supine Hamstring Stretch

5. Hip Abduction

6. Hip Adduction

7. Hip Extension (Prone)

8. Internal Hip Rotation

9. External Hip Rotation

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Purpose of Program

After an injury or surgery, an exercise conditioning program will help you return to daily activities and enjoy a more active, healthy lifestyle. Following a well-structured conditioning program will also help you return to sports and other recreational activities.

This is a general conditioning program that provides a wide range of exercises. To ensure that the program is safe and effective for you, it should be performed under your doctor’s supervision. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about which exercises will best help you meet your rehabilitation goals.

Strength: Strengthening the muscles that support your hip will help keep your hip joint stable. Keeping these muscles strong can relieve pain and prevent further injury.

Flexibility: Stretching the muscles that you strengthen is important for restoring range of motion and preventing injury. Gently stretching after strengthening exercises can help reduce muscle soreness and keep your muscles long and flexible.

Hip Conditioning Program – OrthoInfo – AAOS

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Total Joint Replacement Documentary

Total Joint Replacement: A Patient’s Perspective

AAHKS Offers Documentary in New DVD Format to Increase Awareness of Joint Replacement Benefits

“Total Joint Replacement: A Patient’s Perspective,” a documentary providing an inside look at four real-life patients facing the need for hip and knee replacement surgery, is now available in DVD format.

The American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) sponsored the film in cooperation with the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF). Until now, the 52-minute film had been available on VHS tape and via webcast on http://www.OR-Live.com.

Total Joint Replacement Documentary – AAHKS

Information for Patients – AAHKS

 

Office Visit Tips

Your visit with an orthopaedic surgeon is an important meeting that can be most effective if you plan ahead. It’s important that you give your doctor the information he or she needs and that you understand what your doctor is recommending. The following checklist will help you and your doctor discuss the issues most important for getting the most out of the visit.
Before you go

  1. Find out the basics about the office. Where is it? What time should you arrive? If you’re going to drive, where can your park? Do you need to bring your insurance card or a managed care medical referral?
  2. Assemble your records such as results and copies of X-rays, other imaging studies and lab tests and personally take the records to the doctor’s office.
  3. Make written lists of:
    • Medications you are taking.
    • Your medical history, such as prior treatments for heart or thyroid problems or operations, even those not related to your current problem.
    • Your concerns about your condition (pains, loss of mobility or function).
  4. Consider asking a friend or family member to accompany you. If you need a translator, ask another adult to come with you; don’t rely on a child to translate.
  5. Dress appropriately. For spine and many problems involving the arms and legs, you may be asked to disrobe. Wear loose clothing that’s easy to take off and put on.

Information for Patients – AAHKS

Don’t get too focused on materials being used…

hipreplacement7In planning a hip replacement, one mistake both patients and doctors can make is to become overly concerned with the prosthetics rather than the surgical approach itself.

“People get too focused on what kind of parts and materials are being used,” Dr. Matta said. “That’s a good discussion to have, but what’s more important is what the surgeon will do during the operation. As surgeons, we need to ensure that the muscles around the hip aren’t disturbed, the parts are fitted and oriented properly, and that the leg length is correct. And it behooves us to perform hip replacements that don’t rely on our patients restricting their movements for the rest of their lives.”

Anterior approach patients have no restrictions on their movements. In contrast, patients undergoing traditional surgeries have an extensive list of movements they must avoid to prevent dislocating the new hip. Simple actions such as crossing legs and tying shoes normally may be permanently prohibited. Yoga is out. Even sitting on the toilet can risk dislocation.

READ ON — Saint John’s Health Center

Because of my orthopaedic care, I can…” It isn’t too late to submit your patients’ stories

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ national campaign, A Nation in Motion, shares the stories of more than 600 patients whose lives have been saved or restored through access to high-quality orthopaedic care. These inspiring stories illustrate the conditions, injuries and traumas that millions of patients have braved head on – and the excellent care that got them back to work and to their active, full lives. The patients featured on the website have shared their stories in one simple phrase, “Because of my orthopaedic care, I can…” It isn’t too late to submit your patients’ stories on the site.

Visit anationinmotion.org to submit, read the stories, and to play A Nation in Motion the Game online, and navigate the path of orthopaedic scenarios throughout life before you can successfully reach the “I Can! Club.” The “I Can! Club” represents a full, enjoyable and mobile life.

Twins, 56, have simultaneous, free hip replacements

Twins, 56, have simultaneous, free hip replacements

Sisters Deborah and Sandra Fanelli were high school cheerleaders and, later, professional singers and dancers for 20 years. But in recent years, the twins have developed arthritis so severe that it’s hard for them to walk.

On Friday, the 56-year-olds underwent simultaneous and free hip replacement operations at a hospital near Philadelphia. The surgeries came at no cost to the women because of Operation Walk USA. The program offers free hip and knee replacements for patients without health insurance.

Doctors, hospitals and implant manufacturers donate time and equipment for the procedures. A hip replacement would normally cost about $16,000, plus hospitalization.
About 200 patients nationwide received new joints through the program on Friday.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/12/10/twins-56-have-simultaneous-free-hip-replacements/#ixzz2EiOudhMqn

Hip Replacement Pre-Op and Post-Op Surgery Diary – AARP

My Brand-New Hip: A Personal Tale

Helpful friends, expert therapy and a new surgery technique make hip replacement a success

by: Caitlin Kelly | from: AARP | June 13, 2012

 

Caitlin Kelly takes her first steps after a hip replacement. — Photo by Jose R. Lopez

Things aren’t good when your 83-year-old father has more energy and stamina than you do. An athletic and highly active person since childhood — whose activities included jazz dance, softball, horseback riding, cycling and sailboat racing — I found my life shrinking at 52 due to arthritis in my left hip.

When I’d been diagnosed with it two years earlier, I continued many of my activities. But by the time I was 52, in January 2010, every step was painful, and a hip replacement was inevitable.

See also: 5 steps to a successful hip replacement.

Hip Replacement Pre-Op and Post-Op Surgery Diary – AARP