Week 1: Talking to your Health Care Provider « A Primer for Women’s Health

 

Week 1: Talking to your Health Care Provider

Week 1You get ready for a date. You prepare for tasks and meetings at work. How do you prepare for visits to your health care provider?

The first step is to find a health care provider you feel comfortable with. If you can share how you feel,  both physically and emotionally,  then you and your health care provider can work together as partners in your health care.

Illustration of two women talking to a female doctorA basic plan for your visit can help. Before you arrive,  make a list of things you want to talk about. Put your questions in order,  so you are sure to ask about the most important ones first.

During your visit,  explain your symptoms:  what is bothering you,  when it started,  and if you have noticed any pattern. Ask for clear explanations about your condition,  any medication or treatment,  and instructions on how to recover after an illness,  injury,  or hospital procedure.

Consider bringing a family member or friend. Let them know in advance what you want from your visit. With good communication,  you and your health care provider can team up to make sure you get the best health care possible.

Week 1: Talking to your Health Care Provider « A Primer for Women’s Health

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How to be Participatory in the Face of Adversity | e-Patients.net

 

How to be Participatory in the Face of Adversity

Nancy Finn | May 14, 2013

From the lens of a patient who recently experienced major surgery, I now realize how difficult it is to be participatory when you are in pain and taking large doses of pain medication which dulls the senses and puts you in a place where you are not really thinking about anything but how to get through the next couple of days.

I consider myself to be an empowered patient who fully participates in my health care, questions my clinicians, and evaluates the risk/benefit of treatment plans presented by my clinicians.

I use the health data my clinician offers, including the reports and notes that are in my electronic health record, and confer with people who have had some experience with the same or similar conditions. I always go one step further and search the web for relevant information that applies to my particular health concerns. I provide feedback to my doctors and never hesitate to speak up and ask questions. I tap the wisdom and advice of my peers and encourage my providers to be participatory.

How to be Participatory in the Face of Adversity | e-Patients.net

Having a Hip Replacement | Psychology Today

 

Having a Hip Replacement

Tips on getting through a joint replacement

Published on January 30, 2012 by Paul Thagard in Hot Thought

I’m currently preparing for my second hip replacement to take place in February, remembering the lessons learned from my first one in April, 2011. My younger brother is also getting a new hip in February, so I’m writing this to help him and other people go through a difficult but worthwhile experience. My replaced right hip works wonderfully, free of the pain that started in 1995 and grew steadily worse. There are many Web pages that provide valuable medical information, but in this post I want to focus on practical advice about getting how to manage the whole process.

For medical advice, let me suggest these pages:
Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hip-replacement/MY00235
My Joint Replacement: http://www.myjointreplacement.ca/
My goal in this post is to provide practical suggestions to deal with matters that the medical sites don’t much discuss.

 

Having a Hip Replacement | Psychology Today

Leveraging ePatient Communications | Digital Pharma Blog

 

Leveraging ePatient Communications

Posted by bryonmain on February 28th, 2013

As social media in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industry becomes more widespread, a growing trend is ePatient communication. The internet has become the go-to source of information for many people; that holds true as they research diagnoses, check up on current research, and connect with others for support.

Citizen bloggers, with a particular diagnosis, educate themselves,  and are a key source of information for others with a similar diagnosis. In the digital age, where nearly everyone has a smartphone, these “man on the street” blogs offer a personal voice, answering questions and addressing areas of concern, as well as offering support. Patient bloggers, read by a wide range of patients and caregivers, can be a key source of internet buzz, when they offer a review or opinion on a new therapy or drug treatment option. Pharmaceutical companies can network with these bloggers, gaining both a platform for patient marketing, but also a window into the concerns and trends patients notice.

Leveraging ePatient Communications | Digital Pharma Blog