HIP Health · Hip Journal · Hip Replacement Diary

It’s the Miles – Not the Years!

As hipsters, we at times, are not sure how active to be.  Some of us get stuck in ‘why me’, others go out of their way to be super active to prove bionic hips are as good – if not better – than what we were born with.

Sitting on the sofa and fearing “if we move too much, are “too” active, that our hips won’t last as long” – is not the answer for a long an d happy life.  Afterall, that is what we wanted – to get our life back, free from pain and fear. As in everything, moderation is the key – and continuing on with life the way we were before is important for our emotional health as well.

When I speak to other hipsters, we are all curious about the LIFE of a hip replacement, even long after our parts have expired.  I am a huge chearleader for being your own advocate, and in this light – we must learn about our bodies.  How do we feel after we swim, how does running feel to our hips, knees and legs, is walking the best way to feel healthy and play it safe.  What I am saying is – listen to YOUR body.  Every hip recipeient is different.

So many of us hipsters wonder how long our new hips last us.  Sometimes we stay up at night pondering the possible scenarios…hoping we never have to feel that bone on bone pain again, or worry about another surgery.  Recalling the times we woke up in the middle of the night with that OMG pain when we moved in our sleep.  Or when we had to take comfort in using a cane to help relieve the pain and have assistance in walking.  We recall the times when we cried UNCLE and planned for our hip replacement surgery, feeling like a dog or cat going to the vet…heart pounding, an out of body experience.  The search and mission of finding the right surgeon, researching the right procedures for us and connecting with others for support, encouragement and education.

I recall when I asked a friend how long a case of golf balls will last me.  We both had a good chuckle at the answer, and the humor in the question.  The answer was – it depends how you play, and the course you are on.

Like a classic car that needs to be honored and sometimes rebuilt, our bodies are not that dissimilar.  Whether we need new tires, an alignment, or new brakes – it’s about how we use our bodies, our genetics and what we came into this life with. I consider myself lucky in many ways with a new appreciation of this body of mine, and that now I can also help others who are walking down the path of becoming more bionic.

XOXO

Hipster Girl

HIP Health · Hip Journal

Taking care of your new hip joint

Taking care of your new hip jointTo use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Share on facebook Share on twitter Bookmark & Share Printer-friendly version After you have hip replacement surgery, you will need to be careful how you move your hip, especially for the first few months after surgery. In time, you should be able to return to your previous level of activity. But even when you do your everyday activities, you will need to move carefully so that you do not dislocate your hip.You will need to learn exercises make your new hip stronger.After you fully recover from surgery, you should not downhill ski or do contact sports, such as football and soccer. You should be able to do low impact activities, such as hiking, gardening, swimming, playing tennis, and golfing.

via Taking care of your new hip joint: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia.

HIP Health · Hip Journal · hip pain

Hip Revision Surgery |

Hip Revision Surgery Total hip implant demonstrating socket, liner, ball and stemTotal hip replacement or total hip arthroplasty is a surgical procedure in which an artificial hip joint prosthesis is implanted to replace an arthritic or damaged joint. A hip replacement includes an artificial hip socket and femoral stem with an attached femoral head picture at right.Hip replacement surgery is very effective in relieving pain and improving patient function and quality of life. However, hip replacements may “wear out” or fail for other reasons, and occasionally require a “hip revision surgery.” In hip revision surgery, the worn out or failed prosthesis is replaced with a new hip implant.

via Hip Revision Surgery | St. Louis Hip Surgeon John C. Clohisy.

HIP Health · Hip Journal · hip pain

New method for hip replacement wins favor with some surgeons – The Washington Post

Over the past two decades, the number of Americans having total hip replacements has more than doubled, to more than 300,000 a year. Though most patients eventually walk again without pain or the aid of a cane, recovery and rehabilitation can be rigorous, painful and lengthy. The surgery is extensive: As its name suggests, it involves removing the joint — the damaged bone and cartilage — and replacing it with prosthetic parts made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Typically, surgeons enter the joint from the rear, which requires cutting through muscle and cartilage. But with a relatively new procedure, surgeons enter from the front and only stretch the muscles aside, avoiding the cutting and minimizing pain and recovery time. According to those who use this anterior technique, the benefits are substantial.

via New method for hip replacement wins favor with some surgeons – The Washington Post.

HIP Health · Hip Journal

Hip Replacement Implant Materials

There are a large number of hip implant devices on the market. Each manufacturer has different models but each style falls into one of four basic material categories:metal on plastic polyethylene or UHMWPEmetal on metal MoMceramic on plastic UHMWPEceramic on ceramic CoCThese category names reference the materials used for the implant bearings. The stem and ball fit into and articulate against the cup or acetabulum. Each component can be made of one of several materials.

via Hip Replacement Implant Materials.

Baby Boomer · HIP Health · Hip Journal · Resources

How to be Participatory in the Face of Adversity

From the lens of a patient who recently experienced major surgery, I now realize how difficult it is to be participatory when you are in pain and taking large doses of pain medication which dulls the senses and puts you in a place where you are not really thinking about anything but how to get through the next couple of days.

I consider myself to be an empowered patient who fully participates in my health care, questions my clinicians, and evaluates the risk/benefit of treatment plans presented by my clinicians.

I use the health data my clinician offers, including the reports and notes that are in my electronic health record, and confer with people who have had some experience with the same or similar conditions. I always go one step further and search the web for relevant information that applies to my particular health concerns. I provide feedback to my doctors and never hesitate to speak up and ask questions. I tap the wisdom and advice of my peers and encourage my providers to be participatory.

How to be Participatory in the Face of Adversity | e-Patients.net

Baby Boomer · HIP Health · Hip Journal · Hip Replacement Diary · THR recovery

What to Expect in Your 50s, 60s and 70s – AARP

 

Stay informed: Get news and resources from the Health Newsletter.

With our three AARP “What to Expect” guides (about being in your 50s, 60s and 70s-plus) you’ll learn how to, among other things … save your skin, keep your heart strong, preserve your senses, motivate your metabolism, bone up for good health, improve your sex life, ramp up your immunity, take fewer nighttime trips (to the bathroom), stay sharp and — most importantly — be happy. At every age!

What to Expect in Your 50s, 60s and 70s – AARP

Baby Boomer · Health · HIP Health · Hip Journal

Total Joint Replacement Documentary

Total Joint Replacement: A Patient’s Perspective

AAHKS Offers Documentary in New DVD Format to Increase Awareness of Joint Replacement Benefits

“Total Joint Replacement: A Patient’s Perspective,” a documentary providing an inside look at four real-life patients facing the need for hip and knee replacement surgery, is now available in DVD format.

The American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) sponsored the film in cooperation with the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF). Until now, the 52-minute film had been available on VHS tape and via webcast on http://www.OR-Live.com.

Total Joint Replacement Documentary – AAHKS