hip pain · Jodi Seidler · THR recovery

Mentoring with The Hipster Girl

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Putting the HIP back in Hip Replacements.

Contact me with any questions you have about the hip replacement process.  I’ve become sort of an expert with two different approaches (Anterior and Posterior) and two different implant materials.  With my Journalism background and my inquisitive mind, I should belong to a 12 step group for obsessing about having a hip replacement.  I researched so like crazy, and kept a daily journal until one day I started an online Hip Club for people like me.  One stop shopping to learn about hip replacements.  No need to obsess and stay up all night like I did (unless you want to).

I have had two different hips replaced in two different ways, with two different materials and components.  I’m learning it’s not the years, it’s the miles – so I budget my hips.  I don’t ski, I don’t jog – but that’s just me.  I love to walk and I love to swim.  My left (metal) hip lets me know when I’ve done too much.  It has affected sex a bit, but barely noticeable if it’s done right.  I notice people as they walk by me, that maybe need or have had a hip replacement.  It’s some kind of alien connection to other bionics.  Finally, instead of saying “why me”, let’s get in the habit of saying “why not me”…and see what magic we can create for ourselves and for others in our orbit.

Fill out the form below and we will schedule a time for a no-cost 15 minute informational and supportive phone call regarding joint replacement do’s and don’ts.

HIP Health · hip pain · Hip Replacement Diary · Rebirth Through Pain · Resources

HIP TALK

The Hipster ClubWhen we first discover, through bone-on-bone pain or an achy thigh or hip area, that we will be needing a hip replacement – our minds might be flooded with fears, questions and a WTF moment or two.  I know that my mind and emotions were constantly alternating between disbelief, panic, and numbness.  I went right to the internet and researched all night long, and also kept a journal because I had so much emotion and so many questions pouring out of me all at once.

I wasn’t a dancer, I didn’t jog, I didn’t do extreme sports or obsessive workouts – I just had wear-and-tear arthritis (AO) and dysplasia of the hip (which I did not know I was born with).  The shit hit the fan when I was 50 and raising my son in his teenage years, as a single mom. So, if single parenting wasn’t enough I had to add a few hip replacements into my life’s mix.

Chronic pain is no fun for anyone, and we can easily become isolated, depressed, depleted and feel alone in our journey into becoming bionic. With young hip replacement recipients, many surgeons would ask patients to wait as long as possible before having surgery, and we did what our doctors told us.  We waited until our quality of life got so bad we had to cry “uncle”; I waited two years until I could not even walk.  DON’T WAIT.  Research your options, get advice. Do your homework. Create a joint replacement support team.

What I didn’t know then or could not have fathomed is that my career and journalistic voice was about to change as well, but first I had to go through the dark night of the soul and TWO hips replacements in 3 years. I chose the conventional replacement the first time, with the posterior approach and titanium on plastic – and that was a very hard recovery for me and my little body.

Three years later, and with my right hip, I went to a surgeon who offered the anterior approach and ceramic and plastic. I was driving after two weeks and did not have the restrictions of the other.  I was happy to become a guinea pig of sorts (a very cute one if I may be so bold) and see which approach lasted longer and which had less pain throughout time and travel.  By the way, I was told that both approaches end up the same after the recovery period.

Well, it’s 12 years later, and I have to admit I have had a few bouts of scary pain and ache, which also created a sense memory of all that I went through.  The pain was most uncomfortable: (1) upon rising from a movie theater seat, (2) after more than 3 – 5 hours of walking (Note to self: stretching first is a great idea), (3) I have to get up every 2 – 3 hours of sitting so I do not get stiff or achy.

Remember, it’s the miles – not the years that remind us how long our hips might last.  They could last a lifetime or a few decades – but it is the quality of our lives as hipsters that matter.  Don’t take dangerous chances with your hips but also don’t live quietly either.

Feel your strength for all you have been through, be proud of the new bionic YOU and go out there and rock the world.  Make a difference. Express your strength.  Be there for others. And be YOU in all of your bionic glory!

Feel free to write in your own tips and experiences of pain or relief.  And write me if you need anything in your journey from HIP to Hero.

Forever Yours,

Jodi Seidler, Hipster Girl

 

 

 

Baby Boomer · Health · HIP Health · Hip Replacement Diary · Jodi Seidler · Misc. HIP Things · Rebirth Through Pain · Resources

A HIP New World

 

 

Well, the more people I meet, the more I hear about becoming bionic – with all types of body parts being replaced…it’s pretty surreal, especially when you go through it yourself.

 

 

 

Baby Boomer · Health · HIP Health · Hip Replacement Diary · Misc. HIP Things · Rebirth Through Pain · Resources

Questions To Ask Before Hip Surgery

Questions To Ask Before Hip Surgery by Zimmer

Here’s a list of questions that may be helpful to ask your doctor before your hip surgery. We suggest you print this list and take it with you on your appointment.

 

  1. What complications may occur with this kind of surgery?
  2. What is the expected recovery time?
  3. How many days will I be in the hospital after surgery?
  4. Will I have physical therapy? If so, how often and for how long?
  5. Will I need full-time or part-time care? If so, for how long?
  6. Will I need a hospital bed at home?
  7. When can I lie on the operative side?
  8. How soon will I be able to walk after surgery?
  9. Will I need crutches or a walker? If so, for how long?
  10. How soon will I be able to climb stairs after surgery?
  11. How soon will I be able to drive a car after surgery?
  12. When can I shower after surgery?
  13. How soon will I be able to resume normal lifestyle activities besides walking (e.g., work, sports, housework, gardening, etc.)?
  14. Which sports may I participate in?
  15. What are lifting limits?
  16. When is sexual intercourse feasible after surgery?
  17. Will I set off the metal detectors at the airport?
  18. Will I need antibiotics for dental care?
  19. What is the implant made of? Which biomaterials will be used?
  20. In your estimate, how long will my joint replacement last?
  21. What can I do to help keep my joint replacement functioning as long as possible?
  22. What activities or other factors could make my joint replacement wear out more quickly, and what can I do to avoid them?
Misc. HIP Things

HIP HIP Hurray for ZIMMER!

Hip Pain Relief: Nonsurgical Treatments

Hip Pain Relief: Nonsurgical Treatment Options

When it comes to relieving hip pain, there are many different treatment options. Success varies not only by each individual’s hip, but also by what’s causing your hip pain. Care for arthritis pain, for example, often involves a combination of treatments. Be sure to consult your doctor to discuss the best treatment plan for you.

  • Medication
    Many drugs, both prescriptions and over-the-counter medications, are used to treat arthritis and control pain. Common medications are aspirin-free pain relievers, anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, disease modifiers, and sleep medications.
  • Low-impact exercise
    Regular exercise, including joint and muscle exercise, is important to improve strength and flexibility. It may lessen pain, increase movement, reduce fatigue, and help you look and feel better. And when done properly, it will not “wear out” joints or increase osteoarthritis.
  • Heat/cold therapies
    Use of heat or cold over joints may provide short-term relief from pain and stiffness. Cold packs/baths help reduce inflammation and swelling, and may be useful for flare-ups. Heat assists in relaxing muscles and increasing circulation.
  • Weight management
    Weight loss helps to ease pain by reducing stress on your joints. After all, your hip bears the full load of your weight.
  • Physical and occupational therapy
    Physical therapists can work with you to create a personalized exercise program and show you how to use therapeutic heat and massage. Occupational therapists can introduce you to all kinds of beneficial devices, such as those used to elevate chair or toilet-seat height.
  • Assistive devices
    You can protect your hips by using a cane or other walking aid to keep from putting excess stress on them. Shoe inserts called orthotics are designed to support, align, and improve the function of your foot. In turn, they may lessen the pressure on your hips.
  • Bracing
    Different types of hip braces may help reduce hip pain and improve stability and mobility.
  • Avoidance
    Particular activities to avoid include: excessive stair climbing; impact-loading sports such as jogging, downhill skiing, and high-impact aerobics; physical activities involving quick stop-start motion, twisting, or impact stresses; excessive bending and kneeling; lifting or pushing heavy objects; and sitting on low seating surfaces and chairs. When avoidance is not possible, try alternating periods of activity with periods of rest, so your joints don’t tire from the stress of repeated tasks.
  • Mental health
    Talking about your feelings with family members and friends, doing mental exercises such as meditations and staying positive, and joining local support groups can help you better manage your hip pain.
  • Nontraditional and alternative treatments
    Some people with osteoarthritis take vitamins C and D because of their role in the formation of joint material, including collagen and cartilage. Some take vitamin E, a major dietary antioxidant. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, typically used in combination, are the most commonly used dietary supplements, However, according to a study published in the 2006 New England Journal of Medicine, the results from a glucosamine/chondroitin arthritis trial showed that the supplements were no better at treating osteoarthritis than sugar pills.

Since herbal and dietary supplements are not regulated by the FDA, and the effectiveness of these treatments is not widely supported by accepted scientific research, it is extremely important for you to consult with your physician about all supplements and medications that you’re taking or considering taking.

 

CHEERS TO —   ZIMMER!

 

Baby Boomer · Health · HIP Health · Rebirth Through Pain

TOP 7 HIPster TIPS…During THR Recovery


1.  tvTime to add more movie channels to your TV – ask for a month free promotion.2.   emailAdd email and IM to your phone by getting a month free from your cell phone provider, says time and pain not to have to get up and check your mail; you get everything in one place.3.    baby blankie Buy yourself an adult “blankie” to curl up with and take with you in ever room you lie or relax in.  You should be getting up and changing positions every 25 or 30 minutes.  Taking your “blankie” with you helps to feel secure and safe in the womb of your recovery home.  Mine is a soft, lion-type motif….reminding me that I am strong….like a mother lion.

4.   groceryOrder groceries, water bottles and household items online (I used yummy.com), they deliver your favorites items (including hand-made deli food) and carry it up to your kitchen.

5.    walking with cane Find a neighbor who normally walks daily and ask them if you can tag along on a consistent basis, that way you don’t have to beg or encourage friends to come and take you for a walk.

6.   lettersTell the mailman you’ll be recovering inside your home, and if he/she wouldn’t mind leaving your mail by your door.   You can tip them during the holidays for this gift of convenience.

7.   pink_phone Have a buddy system with a few appointed friends, which you/they check in on daily, in the morning and at night.  Other people and friends have their own lives, and it’s frustrating and almost depressing to feel like you’ve been forgotten during the recovery time.

Take three smaller walks a day instead one big one (which is harder to recover from).  It’s like eating small meals throughout the day – much better for our bodies.  Same with walking….easier to recover from small walks – and more enjoyable to see the world throughout the day!

Ask for what you need – so people know!!! 


Stay tuned for more HIP tips as they reveal themselves!

xoxo…

Baby Boomer · HIP Health · Hip Replacement Diary · Jodi Seidler · Rebirth Through Pain

HIP Coaching


The Creator of HIPSTER CLUB and MAKING LEMONADE is available to coach you through the rough transition into the land of being truly bionic.

YOU shouldn’t walk(er) those streets ALONE.

Whether you’re pre or post surgery, or just researching your options – you are NOT alone!

Spend a month with HIP coach Jodi and learn the INS and OUTS of becoming more HIP.