Baby Boomer · Health · Jodi Seidler · pain relief · Resources

Heal with Frequencies

You probably know that food, water, sunlight, and oxygen are required for life, but there is a fifth element of health that is equally vital and often overlooked: The Earth’s magnetic field and its corresponding PEMFs (pulsed electromagnetic fields). The two main components of Earth’s PEMFs, the Schumann and Geomagnetic frequencies are so essential that NASA and the Russian space program equip their space crafts with devices that replicate these frequencies. These frequencies are absolutely necessary for the human body’s circadian rhythms, energy production, and even keeping the body free from pain. But there is a big problem on planet earth right now, rather, a twofold problem, as to why we are no longer getting these life-nurturing energies of the earth. 

Along with PEMF, Healy is designed to provide you with programs for a variety of local and systemic bioenergetic imbalances all done by frequencies as well in a wearable device delivered by downloads between your phone app and the device itself.

OUR PRODUCTS

 Click to order The Regenetron™ is completely different from all other PEMF machines, with two complete separate, different PEMF machines inside.  Discover freedom from pain and chronic conditions, and promote optimal aging from the inside out. PEMF is cellular exercise based on the principles of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy 

Click to order the Healy, a certified wearable that uses individualized frequencies to help balance your mind and body and relieve stress.  Healy is a microcurrent medical device that has been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for relief of acute, chronic, and arthritis pain and muscle soreness due to overexertion. 

Click to order…With the analysis feature of the Healy Resonance module, doctors, practitioners and other members of the healing profession can be supported with the help of the Resonance analysis for their patients or clients to suggest suitable dietary needs.  Another useful tool in this edition is the Healy Aura module. It lets you analyze the energy distribution of your chakras in the Information Field; after an analysis of the emotional background, you can point out suitable ways of optimization. 

Healy – Frequencies for Your Life

FREQUENCY HEALING IS THE KEY TO SUSTAINING HEALTH AND VITALITY.

The Healy App – First Steps

Healy’s frequency programs can support you after just a 20 minute application, no matter where you are: playing sports, relaxing, at work, home, or on the go.

Call to order: 424-272-6011

HIP Health · Rebirth Through Pain · Resources

▶ Preparing your home for your Hip Replacement – YouTube

Jodi Seidler from Hipster Club shares her tips and insights.

Just like baby proofing your home, it’s important to prepare your home for your hip replacement.

▶ Preparing your home for your Hip Replacement – YouTube

Baby Boomer · HIP Health · Misc. HIP Things · Rebirth Through Pain · Resources · THR recovery

Posterior and Anterior Hip Replacement – Jodi Seidler

 

Read More Patient Stories

Seidler, Jodi

Jodi Seidler

Santa Monica, California

Both Posterior and Anterior Procedures by Robert Klapper, MD and Robert Klenck, MD

Because of my orthopaedic care, I can have MY LIFE BACK, not live in bone-on-bone pain and most importantly I can now help others. I created HIP communities through this life changing process and HIP initiation – at hipsterclub.com and hipsterclub.ning.com.

Posterior and Anterior Hip Replacement – Jodi Seidler

HIP Health · hip pain · Hip Replacement Diary · Rebirth Through Pain · Resources

HIP TALK

The Hipster ClubWhen we first discover, through bone-on-bone pain or an achy thigh or hip area, that we will be needing a hip replacement – our minds might be flooded with fears, questions and a WTF moment or two.  I know that my mind and emotions were constantly alternating between disbelief, panic, and numbness.  I went right to the internet and researched all night long, and also kept a journal because I had so much emotion and so many questions pouring out of me all at once.

I wasn’t a dancer, I didn’t jog, I didn’t do extreme sports or obsessive workouts – I just had wear-and-tear arthritis (AO) and dysplasia of the hip (which I did not know I was born with).  The shit hit the fan when I was 50 and raising my son in his teenage years, as a single mom. So, if single parenting wasn’t enough I had to add a few hip replacements into my life’s mix.

Chronic pain is no fun for anyone, and we can easily become isolated, depressed, depleted and feel alone in our journey into becoming bionic. With young hip replacement recipients, many surgeons would ask patients to wait as long as possible before having surgery, and we did what our doctors told us.  We waited until our quality of life got so bad we had to cry “uncle”; I waited two years until I could not even walk.  DON’T WAIT.  Research your options, get advice. Do your homework. Create a joint replacement support team.

What I didn’t know then or could not have fathomed is that my career and journalistic voice was about to change as well, but first I had to go through the dark night of the soul and TWO hips replacements in 3 years. I chose the conventional replacement the first time, with the posterior approach and titanium on plastic – and that was a very hard recovery for me and my little body.

Three years later, and with my right hip, I went to a surgeon who offered the anterior approach and ceramic and plastic. I was driving after two weeks and did not have the restrictions of the other.  I was happy to become a guinea pig of sorts (a very cute one if I may be so bold) and see which approach lasted longer and which had less pain throughout time and travel.  By the way, I was told that both approaches end up the same after the recovery period.

Well, it’s 12 years later, and I have to admit I have had a few bouts of scary pain and ache, which also created a sense memory of all that I went through.  The pain was most uncomfortable: (1) upon rising from a movie theater seat, (2) after more than 3 – 5 hours of walking (Note to self: stretching first is a great idea), (3) I have to get up every 2 – 3 hours of sitting so I do not get stiff or achy.

Remember, it’s the miles – not the years that remind us how long our hips might last.  They could last a lifetime or a few decades – but it is the quality of our lives as hipsters that matter.  Don’t take dangerous chances with your hips but also don’t live quietly either.

Feel your strength for all you have been through, be proud of the new bionic YOU and go out there and rock the world.  Make a difference. Express your strength.  Be there for others. And be YOU in all of your bionic glory!

Feel free to write in your own tips and experiences of pain or relief.  And write me if you need anything in your journey from HIP to Hero.

Forever Yours,

Jodi Seidler, Hipster Girl

 

 

 

HIP Health · Hip Replacement Diary · Misc. HIP Things · Rebirth Through Pain · Resources

Search Joint Replacement Clinics

Find a Doctor, hospital or Doctor that uses the manufacturers that you want in your hip or knee!

Find Joint Replacement Clinics & Hospitals

Joint Replacement Clinics

Baby Boomer · HIP Health · Hip Journal · Resources

How to be Participatory in the Face of Adversity

From the lens of a patient who recently experienced major surgery, I now realize how difficult it is to be participatory when you are in pain and taking large doses of pain medication which dulls the senses and puts you in a place where you are not really thinking about anything but how to get through the next couple of days.

I consider myself to be an empowered patient who fully participates in my health care, questions my clinicians, and evaluates the risk/benefit of treatment plans presented by my clinicians.

I use the health data my clinician offers, including the reports and notes that are in my electronic health record, and confer with people who have had some experience with the same or similar conditions. I always go one step further and search the web for relevant information that applies to my particular health concerns. I provide feedback to my doctors and never hesitate to speak up and ask questions. I tap the wisdom and advice of my peers and encourage my providers to be participatory.

How to be Participatory in the Face of Adversity | e-Patients.net

Baby Boomer · Health · HIP Health · Resources

Leveraging ePatient Communications | Digital Pharma Blog

 

Leveraging ePatient Communications

Posted by bryonmain on February 28th, 2013

As social media in the pharmaceutical and healthcare industry becomes more widespread, a growing trend is ePatient communication. The internet has become the go-to source of information for many people; that holds true as they research diagnoses, check up on current research, and connect with others for support.

Citizen bloggers, with a particular diagnosis, educate themselves,  and are a key source of information for others with a similar diagnosis. In the digital age, where nearly everyone has a smartphone, these “man on the street” blogs offer a personal voice, answering questions and addressing areas of concern, as well as offering support. Patient bloggers, read by a wide range of patients and caregivers, can be a key source of internet buzz, when they offer a review or opinion on a new therapy or drug treatment option. Pharmaceutical companies can network with these bloggers, gaining both a platform for patient marketing, but also a window into the concerns and trends patients notice.

Leveraging ePatient Communications | Digital Pharma Blog

Baby Boomer · HIP Health · Resources

Peer-to-peer Healthcare

Many Americans turn to friends and family for support and advice when they have a health problem. This report shows how people’s networks are expanding to include online peers, particularly in the crucible of rare disease. 

The most striking finding of the national survey is the extent of peer-to-peer help among people living with chronic conditions. One in four internet users living with high blood pressure, diabetes, heart conditions, lung conditions, cancer, or some other chronic ailment (23%) say they have gone online to find others with similar health concerns. By contrast, 15% of internet users who report no chronic conditions have sought such help online.

When asked about the last time they had a health issue, however, 71% of adults in the U.S. say they received information, care, or support from a health professional. Fifty-five percent of adults say they turned to friends and family. Twenty-one percent of adults say they turned to others who have the same health condition. The oft-expressed fear that patients are using the internet to self-diagnose and self-medicate without reference to medical professionals does not emerge in national phone surveys or in this special rare-disease community survey.
Join a discussion of this report on e-patients.net: Healthcare Out Loud

Peer-to-peer Healthcare | Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project

Baby Boomer · Health · Resources

Arthritis Self-Management Disease Management

Beyond Doctor’s Orders

5 ways to enhance your chance of success with arthritis.

Succeeding with a chronic illness involves more than just following doctor’s orders. If you’re willing to work at it, these five habits will ensure you live successfully with arthritis:

1. Learn all you can.

Knowledge is power. Read everything you can, and locate trusted sources of news and information (online or offline); find out where exercise classes are being held in your community; and ask lots of questions – of your doctor, your physical therapist and other health-care providers.

2. Pay attention to your emotions.

Living with a chronic condition such as arthritis ups your chance of developing depression. Warning signs include constant tiredness, lack of appetite, trouble making decisions, disrupted sleep and feeling worthless. To head off depression, develop a network of family and friends who raise your spirits and can help you keep active.

3. Make your doctor your partner in care.

You’re more likely to find success if you and your physician make informed decisions together. Make sure your doctor spends time with you discussing treatment options and answering all your questions. Talk about ways to improve your functioning, such as losing weight, becoming more active or reducing stress. Don’t be embarrassed to talk to your physician about anything, including admitting when you haven’t followed her advice. Agree to disagree when the two of you have different opinions – and keep talking about it.

Arthritis Self-Management | Disease Management | Arthritis Today