HIP TALK

The Hipster ClubWhen we first discover, through bone-on-bone pain or an achy thigh or hip area, that we will be needing a hip replacement – our minds might be flooded with fears, questions and a WTF moment or two.  I know that my mind and emotions were constantly alternating between disbelief, panic, and numbness.  I went right to the internet and researched all night long, and also kept a journal because I had so much emotion and so many questions pouring out of me all at once.

I wasn’t a dancer, I didn’t jog, I didn’t do extreme sports or obsessive workouts – I just had wear-and-tear arthritis (AO) and dysplasia of the hip (which I did not know I was born with).  The shit hit the fan when I was 50 and raising my son in his teenage years, as a single mom. So, if single parenting wasn’t enough I had to add a few hip replacements into my life’s mix.

Chronic pain is no fun for anyone, and we can easily become isolated, depressed, depleted and feel alone in our journey into becoming bionic. With young hip replacement recipients, many surgeons would ask patients to wait as long as possible before having surgery, and we did what our doctors told us.  We waited until our quality of life got so bad we had to cry “uncle”; I waited two years until I could not even walk.  DON’T WAIT.  Research your options, get advice. Do your homework. Create a joint replacement support team.

What I didn’t know then or could not have fathomed is that my career and journalistic voice was about to change as well, but first I had to go through the dark night of the soul and TWO hips replacements in 3 years. I chose the conventional replacement the first time, with the posterior approach and titanium on plastic – and that was a very hard recovery for me and my little body.

Three years later, and with my right hip, I went to a surgeon who offered the anterior approach and ceramic and plastic. I was driving after two weeks and did not have the restrictions of the other.  I was happy to become a guinea pig of sorts (a very cute one if I may be so bold) and see which approach lasted longer and which had less pain throughout time and travel.  By the way, I was told that both approaches end up the same after the recovery period.

Well, it’s 12 years later, and I have to admit I have had a few bouts of scary pain and ache, which also created a sense memory of all that I went through.  The pain was most uncomfortable: (1) upon rising from a movie theater seat, (2) after more than 3 – 5 hours of walking (Note to self: stretching first is a great idea), (3) I have to get up every 2 – 3 hours of sitting so I do not get stiff or achy.

Remember, it’s the miles – not the years that remind us how long our hips might last.  They could last a lifetime or a few decades – but it is the quality of our lives as hipsters that matter.  Don’t take dangerous chances with your hips but also don’t live quietly either.

Feel your strength for all you have been through, be proud of the new bionic YOU and go out there and rock the world.  Make a difference. Express your strength.  Be there for others. And be YOU in all of your bionic glory!

Feel free to write in your own tips and experiences of pain or relief.  And write me if you need anything in your journey from HIP to Hero.

Forever Yours,

Jodi Seidler, Hipster Girl

 

 

 

It’s the Miles – Not the Years!

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As hipsters, we at times, are not sure how active to be.  Some of us get stuck in ‘why me’, others go out of their way to be super active to prove bionic hips are as good – if not better – than what we were born with.

Sitting on the sofa and fearing “if we move too much, are “too” active, that our hips won’t last as long” – is not the answer for a long an d happy life.  Afterall, that is what we wanted – to get our life back, free from pain and fear. As in everything, moderation is the key – and continuing on with life the way we were before is important for our emotional health as well.

When I speak to other hipsters, we are all curious about the LIFE of a hip replacement, even long after our parts have expired.  I am a huge chearleader for being your own advocate, and in this light – we must learn about our bodies.  How do we feel after we swim, how does running feel to our hips, knees and legs, is walking the best way to feel healthy and play it safe.  What I am saying is – listen to YOUR body.  Every hip recipeient is different.

So many of us hipsters wonder how long our new hips last us.  Sometimes we stay up at night pondering the possible scenarios…hoping we never have to feel that bone on bone pain again, or worry about another surgery.  Recalling the times we woke up in the middle of the night with that OMG pain when we moved in our sleep.  Or when we had to take comfort in using a cane to help relieve the pain and have assistance in walking.  We recall the times when we cried UNCLE and planned for our hip replacement surgery, feeling like a dog or cat going to the vet…heart pounding, an out of body experience.  The search and mission of finding the right surgeon, researching the right procedures for us and connecting with others for support, encouragement and education.

I recall when I asked a friend how long a case of golf balls will last me.  We both had a good chuckle at the answer, and the humor in the question.  The answer was – it depends how you play, and the course you are on.

Like a classic car that needs to be honored and sometimes rebuilt, our bodies are not that dissimilar.  Whether we need new tires, an alignment, or new brakes – it’s about how we use our bodies, our genetics and what we came into this life with. I consider myself lucky in many ways with a new appreciation of this body of mine, and that now I can also help others who are walking down the path of becoming more bionic.

XOXO

 

hipster girl

Hipster Girl

Jodi 

PEMF – Heal Your Hips

Nothing happens in the body without an electromagnetic exchange between cells.

#PEMF is widely used in orthopedics for the treatment of fractures, depression, bone healing; and stimulates cellular cell & bone repair. Magnetic fields pass through the body – even the bones – as if the body wasn’t even there. PEMFs work to repair bones, whether they are damaged by surgery, injury, or disease, and have been found to improve bone regeneration such as occurs with osteoporosis and osteopenia, among other bone destroying conditions.

I 💖 mine so much that I am adding ‘distributor’ to my entrepreneurial portfolio. I have different sizes and strengths for practitioners, athletes and people with chronic pain.

Message me for more info… I will help you heal your body.

Heal Your Body

Get your own PEFM and Heal YOUR Hips

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Hip Replacement Complications & Side Effects– Metallosis & Failure

Hip replacement surgery hip arthroplasty has been touted by many experts as one of the most significant medical device innovations of the last 40 years. It has helped millions of people overcome painful arthritis, recover from hip fractures and improve their quality of life. However, hip implants do not come without risk or complications. A growing number of implant recipients have experienced implant failure and other severe complications associated with their hip replacement.

via Hip Replacement Complications & Side Effects– Metallosis & Failure.

Joint Replacement Clinics – Search here!

hipster club

Find a Doctor, hospital or Doctor that uses the manufacturers that you want in your hip or knee!

Find Joint Replacement Clinics & Hospitals

Joint Replacement Clinics

Total Hip Replacement Implants

A total hip replacement replaces your arthritic hip joint and eliminates the damaged bearing surfaces that are causing pain. The design of the implant offers you renewed stability and minimizes the wear process. The traditional metal and polyethylene implants have been in use since the 1960’s but technological advances since then have made other materials such as ceramic increasingly popular.

More about Hip Implant Materials >>

Total Hip Replacement Implants

What to Expect in Your 50s, 60s and 70s – AARP

 

Stay informed: Get news and resources from the Health Newsletter.

With our three AARP “What to Expect” guides (about being in your 50s, 60s and 70s-plus) you’ll learn how to, among other things … save your skin, keep your heart strong, preserve your senses, motivate your metabolism, bone up for good health, improve your sex life, ramp up your immunity, take fewer nighttime trips (to the bathroom), stay sharp and — most importantly — be happy. At every age!

What to Expect in Your 50s, 60s and 70s – AARP

The Trouble with the New Hip Trend

 

A few years back, many folks with hurting hips were happy to learn that a newer bone-preserving procedure called hip resurfacing could spare them from the more drastic hip replacement.

  But: A huge study has now shown that the newer procedure is more likely to lead to problems than the traditional total hip replacement.

Ashley William Blom, MD, lead author of the new study, weighed in on the results and what they mean for patients   contemplating hip surgery.

  HIP TALK

The Trouble with the New Hip Trend

Hip Conditioning Program – OrthoInfo – AAOS

 

Hip Conditioning Program

Purpose of Program

Getting Started

1. Standing Iliotibial Band Stretch

2. Seated Rotation Stretch

3. Knee to Chest

4. Supine Hamstring Stretch

5. Hip Abduction

6. Hip Adduction

7. Hip Extension (Prone)

8. Internal Hip Rotation

9. External Hip Rotation

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Purpose of Program

After an injury or surgery, an exercise conditioning program will help you return to daily activities and enjoy a more active, healthy lifestyle. Following a well-structured conditioning program will also help you return to sports and other recreational activities.

This is a general conditioning program that provides a wide range of exercises. To ensure that the program is safe and effective for you, it should be performed under your doctor’s supervision. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about which exercises will best help you meet your rehabilitation goals.

Strength: Strengthening the muscles that support your hip will help keep your hip joint stable. Keeping these muscles strong can relieve pain and prevent further injury.

Flexibility: Stretching the muscles that you strengthen is important for restoring range of motion and preventing injury. Gently stretching after strengthening exercises can help reduce muscle soreness and keep your muscles long and flexible.

Hip Conditioning Program – OrthoInfo – AAOS