Hip Conditioning Program – OrthoInfo – AAOS

 

Hip Conditioning Program

Purpose of Program

Getting Started

1. Standing Iliotibial Band Stretch

2. Seated Rotation Stretch

3. Knee to Chest

4. Supine Hamstring Stretch

5. Hip Abduction

6. Hip Adduction

7. Hip Extension (Prone)

8. Internal Hip Rotation

9. External Hip Rotation

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Purpose of Program

After an injury or surgery, an exercise conditioning program will help you return to daily activities and enjoy a more active, healthy lifestyle. Following a well-structured conditioning program will also help you return to sports and other recreational activities.

This is a general conditioning program that provides a wide range of exercises. To ensure that the program is safe and effective for you, it should be performed under your doctor’s supervision. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about which exercises will best help you meet your rehabilitation goals.

Strength: Strengthening the muscles that support your hip will help keep your hip joint stable. Keeping these muscles strong can relieve pain and prevent further injury.

Flexibility: Stretching the muscles that you strengthen is important for restoring range of motion and preventing injury. Gently stretching after strengthening exercises can help reduce muscle soreness and keep your muscles long and flexible.

Hip Conditioning Program – OrthoInfo – AAOS

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Information for Patients – AAHKS

 

Office Visit Tips

Your visit with an orthopaedic surgeon is an important meeting that can be most effective if you plan ahead. It’s important that you give your doctor the information he or she needs and that you understand what your doctor is recommending. The following checklist will help you and your doctor discuss the issues most important for getting the most out of the visit.
Before you go

  1. Find out the basics about the office. Where is it? What time should you arrive? If you’re going to drive, where can your park? Do you need to bring your insurance card or a managed care medical referral?
  2. Assemble your records such as results and copies of X-rays, other imaging studies and lab tests and personally take the records to the doctor’s office.
  3. Make written lists of:
    • Medications you are taking.
    • Your medical history, such as prior treatments for heart or thyroid problems or operations, even those not related to your current problem.
    • Your concerns about your condition (pains, loss of mobility or function).
  4. Consider asking a friend or family member to accompany you. If you need a translator, ask another adult to come with you; don’t rely on a child to translate.
  5. Dress appropriately. For spine and many problems involving the arms and legs, you may be asked to disrobe. Wear loose clothing that’s easy to take off and put on.

Information for Patients – AAHKS

Because of my orthopaedic care, I can…” It isn’t too late to submit your patients’ stories

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ national campaign, A Nation in Motion, shares the stories of more than 600 patients whose lives have been saved or restored through access to high-quality orthopaedic care. These inspiring stories illustrate the conditions, injuries and traumas that millions of patients have braved head on – and the excellent care that got them back to work and to their active, full lives. The patients featured on the website have shared their stories in one simple phrase, “Because of my orthopaedic care, I can…” It isn’t too late to submit your patients’ stories on the site.

Visit anationinmotion.org to submit, read the stories, and to play A Nation in Motion the Game online, and navigate the path of orthopaedic scenarios throughout life before you can successfully reach the “I Can! Club.” The “I Can! Club” represents a full, enjoyable and mobile life.

Hip Replacement Pre-Op and Post-Op Surgery Diary – AARP

My Brand-New Hip: A Personal Tale

Helpful friends, expert therapy and a new surgery technique make hip replacement a success

by: Caitlin Kelly | from: AARP | June 13, 2012

 

Caitlin Kelly takes her first steps after a hip replacement. — Photo by Jose R. Lopez

Things aren’t good when your 83-year-old father has more energy and stamina than you do. An athletic and highly active person since childhood — whose activities included jazz dance, softball, horseback riding, cycling and sailboat racing — I found my life shrinking at 52 due to arthritis in my left hip.

When I’d been diagnosed with it two years earlier, I continued many of my activities. But by the time I was 52, in January 2010, every step was painful, and a hip replacement was inevitable.

See also: 5 steps to a successful hip replacement.

Hip Replacement Pre-Op and Post-Op Surgery Diary – AARP

A HIP New World

 

 

Well, the more people I meet, the more I hear about becoming bionic – with all types of body parts being replaced…it’s pretty surreal, especially when you go through it yourself.

 

 

 

Please Submit Your HIP Replacement Stories

Please send me YOUR HIP (replacement) stories, and videos for a collection I am putting together.

Please email me your “landscape view” HIP replacement process, covering your emotions, tips, and outcome.

This is of great benefit for others going through this hip initiation.

Questions To Ask Before Hip Surgery

Questions To Ask Before Hip Surgery by Zimmer

Here’s a list of questions that may be helpful to ask your doctor before your hip surgery. We suggest you print this list and take it with you on your appointment.

 

  1. What complications may occur with this kind of surgery?
  2. What is the expected recovery time?
  3. How many days will I be in the hospital after surgery?
  4. Will I have physical therapy? If so, how often and for how long?
  5. Will I need full-time or part-time care? If so, for how long?
  6. Will I need a hospital bed at home?
  7. When can I lie on the operative side?
  8. How soon will I be able to walk after surgery?
  9. Will I need crutches or a walker? If so, for how long?
  10. How soon will I be able to climb stairs after surgery?
  11. How soon will I be able to drive a car after surgery?
  12. When can I shower after surgery?
  13. How soon will I be able to resume normal lifestyle activities besides walking (e.g., work, sports, housework, gardening, etc.)?
  14. Which sports may I participate in?
  15. What are lifting limits?
  16. When is sexual intercourse feasible after surgery?
  17. Will I set off the metal detectors at the airport?
  18. Will I need antibiotics for dental care?
  19. What is the implant made of? Which biomaterials will be used?
  20. In your estimate, how long will my joint replacement last?
  21. What can I do to help keep my joint replacement functioning as long as possible?
  22. What activities or other factors could make my joint replacement wear out more quickly, and what can I do to avoid them?